Intimidating great staff

Some compare Monsanto’s hard-line approach to Microsoft’s zealous efforts to protect its software from pirates.

At least with Microsoft the buyer of a program can use it over and over again.

Rinehart later learned that the company had been secretly investigating farmers in his area.

Rinehart never heard from Monsanto again: no letter of apology, no public concession that the company had made a terrible mistake, no offer to pay his attorney’s fees. “If I tried to do something like that it would be bad news. seeds, in 1996, Monsanto has launched thousands of investigations and filed lawsuits against hundreds of farmers and seed dealers.

Everyone knows Rinehart, who was born and raised in the area and runs one of Eagleville’s few surviving businesses.

The stranger came up to the counter and asked for him by name.“Well, that’s me,” said Rinehart.

I felt like I was in another country.”Gary Rinehart is actually one of Monsanto’s luckier targets. In a 2007 report, the Center for Food Safety, in Washington, D. Even more significant, in the Center’s opinion, are the numbers of farmers who settle because they don’t have the money or the time to fight Monsanto.

“The number of cases filed is only the tip of the iceberg,” says Bill Freese, the Center’s science-policy analyst.

Farmers say that some Monsanto agents pretend to be surveyors.

Others do, but ignore the stipulation rather than throw away a perfectly usable product. seeds to get mixed in with traditional varieties when seeds are cleaned by commercial dealers for re-planting. seeds and doesn’t want them on his land, it’s a safe bet he’ll get a visit from Monsanto’s seed police if crops grown from G. What they may not know is that the company now profoundly influences—and one day may virtually control—what we put on our tables. Many more products have been developed or are in the pipeline, including seeds for sugar beets and alfalfa. agenda, Monsanto is buying up conventional-seed companies. Another reason for their attraction is convenience.

Still others say that they don’t use Monsanto’s genetically modified seeds, but seeds have been blown into their fields by wind or deposited by birds. The seeds look identical; only a laboratory analysis can show the difference. For most of its history Monsanto was a chemical giant, producing some of the most toxic substances ever created, residues from which have left us with some of the most polluted sites on earth. The company is also seeking to extend its reach into milk production by marketing an artificial growth hormone for cows that increases their output, and it is taking aggressive steps to put those who don’t want to use growth hormone at a commercial disadvantage. In 2005, Monsanto paid

Farmers say that some Monsanto agents pretend to be surveyors.

Others do, but ignore the stipulation rather than throw away a perfectly usable product. seeds to get mixed in with traditional varieties when seeds are cleaned by commercial dealers for re-planting. seeds and doesn’t want them on his land, it’s a safe bet he’ll get a visit from Monsanto’s seed police if crops grown from G. What they may not know is that the company now profoundly influences—and one day may virtually control—what we put on our tables. Many more products have been developed or are in the pipeline, including seeds for sugar beets and alfalfa. agenda, Monsanto is buying up conventional-seed companies. Another reason for their attraction is convenience.

Still others say that they don’t use Monsanto’s genetically modified seeds, but seeds have been blown into their fields by wind or deposited by birds. The seeds look identical; only a laboratory analysis can show the difference. For most of its history Monsanto was a chemical giant, producing some of the most toxic substances ever created, residues from which have left us with some of the most polluted sites on earth. The company is also seeking to extend its reach into milk production by marketing an artificial growth hormone for cows that increases their output, and it is taking aggressive steps to put those who don’t want to use growth hormone at a commercial disadvantage. In 2005, Monsanto paid $1.4 billion for Seminis, which controlled 40 percent of the U. market for lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetable and fruit seeds. By using Roundup Ready soybean seeds, a farmer can spend less time tending to his fields. But out in the American countryside, Monsanto’s no-holds-barred tactics have made it feared and loathed.

In Iraq, the groundwork has been laid to protect the patents of Monsanto and other G. To be sure, more and more agricultural corporations and individual farmers are using Monsanto’s G. Faced with a federal lawsuit, Rinehart had to hire a lawyer.

Monsanto eventually realized that “Investigator Jeffery Moore” had targeted the wrong man, and dropped the suit.

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Farmers say that some Monsanto agents pretend to be surveyors.Others do, but ignore the stipulation rather than throw away a perfectly usable product. seeds to get mixed in with traditional varieties when seeds are cleaned by commercial dealers for re-planting. seeds and doesn’t want them on his land, it’s a safe bet he’ll get a visit from Monsanto’s seed police if crops grown from G. What they may not know is that the company now profoundly influences—and one day may virtually control—what we put on our tables. Many more products have been developed or are in the pipeline, including seeds for sugar beets and alfalfa. agenda, Monsanto is buying up conventional-seed companies. Another reason for their attraction is convenience.Still others say that they don’t use Monsanto’s genetically modified seeds, but seeds have been blown into their fields by wind or deposited by birds. The seeds look identical; only a laboratory analysis can show the difference. For most of its history Monsanto was a chemical giant, producing some of the most toxic substances ever created, residues from which have left us with some of the most polluted sites on earth. The company is also seeking to extend its reach into milk production by marketing an artificial growth hormone for cows that increases their output, and it is taking aggressive steps to put those who don’t want to use growth hormone at a commercial disadvantage. In 2005, Monsanto paid $1.4 billion for Seminis, which controlled 40 percent of the U. market for lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetable and fruit seeds. By using Roundup Ready soybean seeds, a farmer can spend less time tending to his fields. But out in the American countryside, Monsanto’s no-holds-barred tactics have made it feared and loathed.In Iraq, the groundwork has been laid to protect the patents of Monsanto and other G. To be sure, more and more agricultural corporations and individual farmers are using Monsanto’s G. Faced with a federal lawsuit, Rinehart had to hire a lawyer.Monsanto eventually realized that “Investigator Jeffery Moore” had targeted the wrong man, and dropped the suit.

.4 billion for Seminis, which controlled 40 percent of the U. market for lettuce, tomatoes, and other vegetable and fruit seeds. By using Roundup Ready soybean seeds, a farmer can spend less time tending to his fields. But out in the American countryside, Monsanto’s no-holds-barred tactics have made it feared and loathed.

In Iraq, the groundwork has been laid to protect the patents of Monsanto and other G. To be sure, more and more agricultural corporations and individual farmers are using Monsanto’s G. Faced with a federal lawsuit, Rinehart had to hire a lawyer.

Monsanto eventually realized that “Investigator Jeffery Moore” had targeted the wrong man, and dropped the suit.

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